Tuesday, August 18, 2009

Laminating aft deck

The flush mounted hatch handle. I'm satisfied and the anchor well hatch will probably receive a similar handle.


I laminated the anchor well hatch opening. Prior to laminating, the anchor well itself was temporarily positioned using a piece of wood between the bunk top and the anchor well bottom. This was to make sure the deck shape was correct during lamination.


I started cutting the fabric for the aft deck. I have decided to laminate, on all surfaces susceptible to impact traumas, such as a falling winch handle or floating timber, to use a combination of carbon and aramid as I did with the floats. One layer of plain carbon covered by one hybrid layer. The combined carbon content is the equivalent to the "A" fabric, and there is approximately 160 g/m² aramid in the outer layer. This will not make a bullet proof hull but a light hull that can handle regular use (and light abuse). Here the carbon pieces pre fitted.


Luckily, I was quite meticulous when wetting out the fabric as I was not able to pull a decent vacuum. I don't know why. I used 1,6 kg of epoxy on ca 1,2 kg of exotic fibres and all was thoroughly wetted out and covered with peel ply, also wetted out. There is some degree of vacuum and this is hopefully enough to avoid any bubble trouble, but I doubt it will pull anything in to the bleeder. Time will show.

5 comments:

Tor Rabe said...

Removed the bag today, not able to do anything else due to a finger operation because a penetrating carbon fiber induced paronychia. it looked ok, no bubbles but one small wrinkle. Everything seemed well wetted out and the deck was rock solid.

bucko00014 said...

Hi Tor , that seems a very heavy lay-up for carbon/aramid . My mathematics indicate 700g/m2 which is over what is called for in just glass . I think your boat will be able to serve also as an icebreaker (though very lightweight)! Cheers , Jim Buckland .

Tor Rabe said...

It would be ice-proof, but not very light. With "A" equivalent I mean the equivalent strength, not weight. No numbers here, due to proprietary/copyrighted information but my lay up is considerably stiffer than and also considerable lighter than the specified glass scheme. I love these materials and methods, it's pure fun for every part made to feel the weight/strength!

bucko00014 said...

I agree , these materials are wonderful , we have just made the aft cabin traveller , did it in one piece in a perspex mould with vacuum and it weighs less than 2kg but is immensely rigid . Best wishes for your finger ! Cheers , Jim B.

Silas said...

Hi bucko00014, you said a perspex mould? You found the mould to be rigid enough to resist warping even under vacuum? Did you attempt any finishing/fairing of the mould and if so how did you find the perspex to work with? Maybe this would be an alternative to high density MDF for dagger and rudder moulds...